First Nations Programs & Partnerships

Fish Traps
“Probably the most productive of any of the fishing devices, the traps and weirs allowed large quantities of fish to be taken at a time when the salmon runs were at their peak.”
~ Ancestral technology 9, Reading and Visual Supplement to Teacher Manual p. 26

 

Making Fishtraps - Ancestral Technology Camp, Nänkäk Chèholay, May 28, 2013

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Collecting Willow

Making a Fishtrap

“Two basic principles were responsible for the success of almost all the weirs and traps. One was the relentless urge of the salmon to make its way upstream to its spawning grounds despite all obstacles; the other was governed by the ebb and flow of the tide.” “Variations in trap devices depended on the species of fish, the type pf environment, the building materials available, and the cultural background of the people.”

~ Ancestral technology 9, Reading and Visual Supplement to Teacher Manual p. 26

“Many species of fish drift shoreward on the incoming tide, and recede again to deep water on the ebb tide. This is especially applied to salmon congregated at the mouth of a river as they awaited melting snows or heavy rain to swell the creek. They swam over the traps on the flood tide and became trapped or stranded on the ebb.”

~ Ancestral technology 9, Reading and Visual Supplement to Teacher Manual p. 26

“Variations in trap devices depended on the species of fish, the type of environment, the building materials available, and the cultural background of the people."

~ Ancestral technology 9, Reading and Visual Supplement to Teacher Manual p. 26