First Nations Programs & Partnerships

Programs & Supports
All students benefit from including First Nations perspectives. Making children aware of their own culture — and the cultures of others — enhances their learning. Educators utilize a variety of teaching strategies to build uponindividual knowledge, culture & strengths.

  • Community Heritage Adventure Outdoors and Skills (CHAOS 9)
    CHAOS - Community : Heritage : Adventure : Outdoors : Skills - CHAOS is an experiential program that is offered to Yukon students in grades 9 and 10 and is be based at Wood Street. "CHAOS" stands for Community, Heritage, Adventure, Outdoors and Skills. These programs have been developed in collaboration with the First Nations Programs and Partnerships Unit at the Department of Education.
  • Community Education Liaison Coordinator (CELC) & Education Support Worker (ESW)
  • Community Orientations
    This initiative assists schools with community-based orientations, which provide teachers, principals and school council members with a better understanding of Yukon First Nations culture, history and language. Each rural school is required to fund at least three different cultural activities that bring together school staff, school council and First Nations. In the past activities have included professional development for school staff on land claims and First Nations government, demonstrations of First Nations local resources, visits to a traditional site and community dinners. Rural schools can obtain up to $1,500 which can be used to hire an assistant, purchase materials, provide a meal, subsidize transportation costs, and pay honoraria to Elders.
  • Community Tutoring Programs
    In partnership with local First Nations and local school councils, the Home Tutor Program provides the opportunity for students to participate in after school/home tutoring in their community. Currently this program is operating in 14 Yukon communities.
  • Cultural Inclusion Program
    Funding is available to Yukon schools to develop and implement cultural activities, projects and programs. The primary focus has been First Nations activities such as carving, beading, drum making and culture camps. The school, school council and the First Nation work together on these initiatives. The school principal or cultural committee can provide information about obtaining funds for this program. Each school receives a base amount of $5,000 and an additional $25 per student (based on the previous year’s enrollment). Past projects have included carving, moccasin making, beadwork, bison hunts, canoe-building and cultural project materials for classrooms and culture camps. For more information, contact the FNPP Director, Education Support Worker (ESW), Community Education Liaison Coordinator (CELC), school principal or the Central Education Support Worker (CESW).
  • Elder in the Schools Program (EIS)
    The EIS program ensures that Elders are an integral part of the school's overall Cultural Inclusion Plan and the program also provides Elders with the opportunity to share their cultural experiences, knowledge, skills and perspectives with the school staff and the student population. The definition of an Elder is determined by the First Nation. Many First Nations have Elders and younger First Nation resource people who work together. The funding can be used for honoraria for many traditional teachers throughout the year or for salaries for one or more traditional teachers.
    Through the EIS program:
    • Teachers are able to connect the curriculum areas with valid and authentic cultural information/activities through the EIS program.
    • The school is provided with a cultural and language resource person who is able to confirm and model respectful protocol in meetings, assemblies and cultural activities.
    • The students experience firsthand the role of a First Nation Elder as an advisor, counselor, cultural expert, mentor, and traditional teacher.
    • The school administration, teachers, students and parents experience the presence of a First Nation Elder throughout the school.
  • Home Tutor Program
    In partnership with local First Nations and local schools, the Home Tutor Program provides after-school tutoring for students in their homes, First Nation office, or school. For further information please contact the Director of Learning Support Services at (867) 667-5609.
  • Orientation for New Teachers to the Yukon
    One day of the annual two-day event is co-hosted by Yukon Education and a local Yukon First Nation or First Nations. The orientation is designed to provide newly-hired teachers with an introduction to Yukon First Nations culture and languages and help them develop strong, lasting and meaningful relationships with First Nations. The one day is dedicated to learning about the local First Nation's culture, history and language, while the other two days are spent familiarizing teachers with the department's central staff and administrative matters. To date, Ta'an Kwäch'än Council, Teslin Tlingit Council, Carcross/Tagish First Nation, Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation and Champagne & Aishihik First Nations have hosted these orientations.
  • Training for Language Teachers
    The Yukon Department of Education provides funding to support six First Nations language teacher trainees each year. The training program is developed and designed through a partnership initiative involving Yukon Native Language Centre, Council of Yukon First Nations, First Nation Programs and Partnerships and the Yukon First Nation Education Advisory Committee. The program's goal is to address the need for a new generation of language teachers who can speak their First Nation language fluently and who have all the tools needed to successfully deliver First Nations language programs in Yukon schools.
  • Yukon Language School Programs in Yukon Schools
    In Part 5 of the Education Act, the Government of Yukon requires that First Nations languages be taught in Yukon schools. With the exception of Tagish, all of the Yukon First Nations languages are being taught as second-language programs in 20 Yukon schools.
  • Training for Language Teachers
    The Yukon Department of Education provides funding to support six First Nations language teacher trainees each year. The training program is developed and designed through a partnership initiative involving Yukon Native Language Centre, Council of Yukon First Nations, First Nation Programs and Partnerships and the Yukon First Nation Education Advisory Committee.